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[personal profile] poetree_admin
“Each time is true, but the truths are not the same.”

    ― Alan Lightman, Einstein's Dreams
---

What's the time? Depends on who you ask — and where you're standing. To someone on a planet 63 light years away, the year on Earth is 1951. To a fly, 'now' is quite literally longer. ("Research suggests perception of time is linked to size, explaining why insects find it easy to avoid being swatted.")

The rate of our metabolisms are linked to the span of our lives in ways we do not fully understand. Our cells oscillate with the earth passing around the sun, our clocks are calibrated to hyperfine transitions of atoms, and age like time proves relative over and over again.

This week, we explore perceptions of time through poetry. Please see the schedule below to orient yourself temporally:


Wednesday: [personal profile] alee_grrl: Playing with Time - Prompt and Response Game

Thursday: [personal profile] jjhunter: Poem: "around the day (circadian)"

Friday: [personal profile] kaberett: Time Heals All Wounds

Saturday: [personal profile] ysabetwordsmith, Time: A Weapon of Mass Destruction & Poem: "A One-Way Trip"

___
Last edited 4/5/14 by jjhunter
poetree_admin: Paper sculpture of bulbuous tree made from strips of book pages (Default)
[personal profile] poetree_admin
alee_grrl
This month's community themed week is going to be centered around perceptions of time. A few weeks ago the majority of US states (all except Arizona and Hawaii) shifted forward an hour for Daylight Savings Time. This bi-annual shifting frequently provokes reflection. There are standardized concepts of time, which can be varied by culture and time even in our digitally interconnected age. Then there are personal perceptions of time, both through our internal clocks and rhythms to how we experience individual moments in time. Poetry has long been used to explore these themes and the social and cultural themes that are so heavily entwined with these perceptions. Please comment below if you would like to host a day during this week, and note which day would work best for you.

Resources )

Schedule )

___
last edited 4/1/14 by jjhunter
poetree_admin: Paper sculpture of bulbuous tree made from strips of book pages (Default)
[personal profile] poetree_admin
The way we see the world is shaped in part by the way we see the world: it's easier to notice and remember what you have ready words (and ready stories) for. As language less welded to convention, language that innovates and rewords, language that unsettles at times as much as connects — poetry speaks to the heart of politics: who constitutes 'we'; what's worthy of notice; how should people and institutions relate to each other.

This week we communal we offer each other a feast of poets and poetry in dialogue with bodies politic.


Tuesday: [personal profile] jjhunter: Taxonomists 'R Us: Phylogeny of Political Metaphor

Wednesday: [personal profile] leek: Carolyn Forche

Thursday: [personal profile] raze: Politics, Poetry, and Pride: Langston Hughes & the Harlem Renaissance

Friday: [personal profile] anonymous_sibyl: Re-crafting Competing Narratives: Finding The Role of the Poet in the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict

Saturday: [personal profile] kaberett: Powerful words: the personal is political

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Last edited 2/22/14 by jjhunter
poetree_admin: Paper sculpture of bulbuous tree made from strips of book pages (Default)
[personal profile] poetree_admin
November commemorates. From rituals of remembrance to those of harvest, we make honored space for death as part and apart from life.

As our dead are especially present this month, our community themed week this week focuses on remembrance. Let's introduce each other to those we carry with us. Let's make a kind and listening space for the absences that shape (and sometimes shake) us.


Monday: [personal profile] alee_grrl: November Remembrances

Tuesday: [personal profile] ysabetwordsmith: veterans and war memorials, Poem: Written in Stone

Wednesday: [personal profile] bookblather: Poem: Death Sucks: A Sonnet Cycle, by Jo Walton

Thursday: [personal profile] raze: Exploring The Rainbow Bridge

Friday: [personal profile] cadenzamuse: In Memoriam: Cards, Words, Pomegranates

Saturday: [personal profile] kaberett and [personal profile] jjhunter: Collaborative Poem: branches reaching deep into the earth

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Last edited 11/24/13 by alee_grrl
poetree_admin: Paper sculpture of bulbuous tree made from strips of book pages (Default)
[personal profile] poetree_admin
"Of the nine books of lyrics that Sappho is said to have composed, one poem has survived complete. All the rest are fragments."

"Hellenistic poets called her 'the tenth Muse' or 'the mortal Muse'"

    - 'Introduction', If Not, Winter: Fragments of Sappho - Anne Carson.
---

Our central text for this week comes to us from more than two thousand five hundred years in the past. Sappho's original poem would have been lyric in the oldest sense of the word: intended for singing or chanting with musical lyre accompaniment. That the words, if not the music, were transcribed and treasured is testament both to their power and to how highly Sappho was regarded by her contemporaries and later generations. Centuries after her death, the Library of Alexandria staff collected every surviving poem of hers into nine papyrus scroll books, and listed Sappho as one of the nine ancient Greek 'lyric poets' most worthy of close study. In other words, Sappho was regularly listed in the ancient 'top ten nine' in her chosen art - no easy feat for any poet working in that tradition, let alone a female one.

The Library of Alexandria burned. Julius Caesar set fire to it; Emperor Aurelian burnt the entire city quarter to the ground; its daughter library in the Serapeum was destroyed, possibly by Pope Theophilus; no one knows for sure if there was a library left to burn by the time commander Amr ibn Al-Asi came conquering. The wonder is not that there is only one whole poem of Sappho's left; the wonder is that there are any fragments left at all, and that we can still find meaning in them after such millennia.

This week, we will explore Fragment 16 primarily in translation, re-examining it in light of its cultural and historical contexts, reimagining it as set to music, remixing it into new poetry, and revisiting more generally how we make sense of gaps in our record & our understanding of the past.


Monday: [personal profile] rainjoy: Greek Conceptions of Beauty, and Other Notes on Translation

Tuesday: [personal profile] luzula: Sappho's 16th fragment set to music

Wednesday: [personal profile] poetree_admin: ['free space of imaginal adventure' in honor of missing matter]

Thursday: [personal profile] alexconall: advancing Sappho into the English-speaking modern day [remix poem]

Friday: [personal profile] kaberett: Ringing steel, or, resonance

Saturday: [personal profile] cirque: Small Miracles

---
Last edited 9/21/13 by jjhunter
poetree_admin: Paper sculpture of bulbuous tree made from strips of book pages (Default)
[personal profile] poetree_admin
  • diction (dikSHən), noun: the choice and use of words and phrases in speech or writing

  • dicty (dɪkti) AAVE, adjective: snobbish; ostentatiously stylish; pretentious

  • delight (diˈlīt), noun: great pleasure


As detailed in the signup post, this week we dart delightedly into wordplay, word choice, and words themselves as whimsy-worthy of celebration in their own right.


MONDAY: [personal profile] lizcommotion: 'To Dye Today' [poem]

TUESDAY: [personal profile] poetree_admin: Alliterative Amusements [wordplay game]

WEDNESDAY: [personal profile] raze: 'Bird is the Word' [poem]

THURSDAY: Day of silver silence

FRIDAY: [personal profile] lnhammer: Dictioning Hopkins's "The Windhover"

SATURDAY: Day of silver silence II

___
Last edited 7/28/13 by jjhunter
poetree_admin: Paper sculpture of bulbuous tree made from strips of book pages (Default)
[personal profile] poetree_admin
As part of our collaboration with this year's Pod Together challenge, this week POETREE is hosting a parallel two-week icebreaker focusing on helping people of all skill levels warm up their creative juices, get acquainted with the resources [community profile] poetree has to offer, and get oriented re: the challenges and pleasures unique to creating poetry rather than prose for such a challenge.

We hope all of you, [community profile] pod_together participants and the broader [community profile] poetree community alike, have fun with what we have planned.

This week's schedule behind the cut )
===

Last edited 7/7/13 by jjhunter
poetree_admin: Paper sculpture of bulbuous tree made from strips of book pages (Default)
[personal profile] poetree_admin
jjhunter

As written or spoken language in extraordinary form, poetry is a natural home for metaphor and emotional intensity. Feelings that may be difficult to express in everyday language find potent release in matching the form and feel of words and their meanings more tightly to their intended effect.

Thus, the closer we get to talking about what is not ordinarily said, or deeply personal, or complicated and achingly vulnerable - in short, the closer we get to emotional intimacy - the more we turn to song and poetry to bypass the usual boundaries of polite distance and speak heart-to-heart.

This week at POETREE, we hope you will join us in letting go a little of that protective distance, and engage openly and honestly with our various hosts' offerings on the theme of emotional intimacy.

Schedule behind the cut )

===
Last edited 6/23/13 by jjhunter
poetree_admin: Paper sculpture of bulbuous tree made from strips of book pages (Default)
[personal profile] poetree_admin
alee_grrl

This week we are celebrating and exploring the poetry of Dr. Seuss. The son of German immigrants and brewmasters, Theodor Seuss Geisel was born in Springfield, Massachusetts in 1904. He developed a love of rhyme as a child, and credited his mother, Henrietta Seuss Geisel, with instilling this love. She had chanted little rhymes to soothe her children to sleep. He started using Seuss, the middle name he shared with his mother, as a pseudonym while attending Dartmouth College. After he graduated from Dartmouth, he briefly attended Oxford University, where he met his first wife, Helen Palmer. After returning from a tour of Europe, he pursued a career as a cartoonist.

Much of his early career was spent doing advertisements for Standard Oil Company. But as World War II approached, Seuss began doing political cartoons for PM, a liberal magazine. He also joined Frank Capra's Signal Corps, where he helped making training films. This is where he learned the art of animation. During this time he was commissioned by Viking Press to illustrate a selection of children's sayings, and while the book wasn't a huge success his illustrations were met with critical acclaim. This would lead to his first children's book, To Think that I Saw It on Mulberry Street. He went on to write and illustrate 44 children's books before his death in 1991, and his works have continued to inspire children and adults. For more on his fascinating life, please see: "Dr. Seuss" Biography, and the Dr. Seuss wikipedia article.

This week we are going to be exploring and celebrating Seuss's poetry in a variety of ways, including a tongue twister-challenge, a new Climbing the Poet's Tree writing challenge, and some in depth exploration of individual poems. There are still open spots if you are interested in participating!

This week's schedule )

Last edited 12/4/13 by jjhunter
poetree_admin: Paper sculpture of bulbuous tree made from strips of book pages (Default)
[personal profile] poetree_admin
For our next multi-Hosted week we will use Dana Gioia's 1992 essay Can Poetry Matter? as a touchstone for exploring big questions about what significance poetry currently has today and what it can offer in a world of rapid social and technological change. Twenty years later, do Gioia's observations hold true for poetry in the United States? What about other countries, other traditions?

Ideally we would like to have one post a day from Monday, Feb. 25th through Saturday, Mar. 2nd. Though this round's theme lends itself to essays, Hosts are also welcome to post in other (or multiple) formats such as original poetry or dialogues. As a general courtesy, please remember to include transcripts for any audio or video, and English translations for spoken or written quotations in other languages.

If you would like to participate, please comment on this post with your preferred day to Host and roughly what you think you'll focus on. Assignment of days will be on a first come, first served basis; this post will be edited as slots fill up to show which days are still available. Participation is not limited to current comm members or even Dreamwidth members - please contact the admins at poetree.at.dreamwidth [at] gmail if you will need someone to post on your behalf. More than one person can collaborate on a particular post if some wish to sign up as a group.

Available days behind the cut )
poetree_admin: Paper sculpture of bulbuous tree made from strips of book pages (Default)
[personal profile] poetree_admin
As the new year opens, so too does [community profile] poetree: our next multi-Hosted week will focus on the theme of "cycles".

Ideally we will have one post a day from Monday, December 31st to Saturday, January 5th featuring poetry or discussion of poetry that explores, explicates, and/or elaborates on something cyclic. Whether seasonal or historical, biological or behavioral, tangible or metaphorical, as long as there's a repeating pattern at work it's fair game to claim.

If you are interested in Hosting one of the days, please comment on this post with your planned subject to claim an open slot; particular days are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Groups of two or more people are welcome to collaborate on Hosting a day together.

Details of available days behind the cut )

Last updated 1/2/2013 by jjhunter
poetree_admin: Paper sculpture of bulbuous tree made from strips of book pages (Default)
[personal profile] poetree_admin
[community profile] poetree usually features several poems each week chosen by the weekly Poetry Host. For this multi-Hosted themed week, we will explore in depth one poem: Julia Stein's "Downtown Women".

Ideally we will have one post each day from Monday, Sept. 10th through Saturday, Sept. 15th, that enhances, changes, or challenges how a reader might approach rereading the original poem. One might sign up to provide an overview of the poem's historical context and offer references for further reading; to translate the poem (literal, as in translating from English to another language, or metaphorical, as in 'translating' from the medium of written poetry to a different medium such as audio performance or visual art); to write a new poem that remixes or responds to the original; or do something else that fits the week's overall theme.

If you are interested in participating, please leave a comment on this post indicating what day(s) you might be available & what type of content (e.g. literal translation, remix poem, historical context, etc.) you think you'd like to post. Assignment of days will be on a first come, first served basis; this post will be edited as slots fill up to show which days are still available. Participation is not limited to current comm members or even Dreamwidth members - please contact the admins at poetree.at.dreamwidth [at] gmail if you will need someone to post on your behalf. More than one person can collaborate on a particular post if some wish to sign up as a group. Finally, we strongly recommend preparing your content in advance of Monday, Sept. 10th.

Signup Slots: Monday - Saturday )

N.B. that comm challenges #21 and 22 are thematically related to this week; check out their announcement post for details.

Last edited 9/16/12 by jjhunter
alee_grrl: Sculpture made from recycled book pages depicting a tree growing from a book of poetry (poetree)
[personal profile] alee_grrl
June 27th marks the anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, which sparked the already burgeoning Gay Pride movement into a full fledged national phenomenon. Since I am not physically capable of attending a Pride event this year, I have been celebrating by watching documentaries and movies on the QUILTBAG community. It occurred to me that next week (we currently do not have a scheduled host) might be a great time for a multi-hosted themed week, in particular one celebrating poetry from the QUILTBAG (which though odd sounding to me at first is much easier to remember than the all inclusive variants of LGBT) community. Would folks be interested in such a week?

If you are interested and would like to host a day please respond to this post and tell me which day (Monday through Saturday) would work best for you.

Monday: [personal profile] raze
Tuesday: [personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
Wednesday: [personal profile] raze
Thursday: [personal profile] zirconium
Friday: [personal profile] wordweaverlynn
Saturday: [personal profile] alee_grrl (totally willing to reschedule if Saturday works better for someone else)
alee_grrl: Sculpture made from recycled book pages depicting a tree growing from a book of poetry (poetree)
[personal profile] alee_grrl
So we need to reschedule the Multi-Hosted week on teaching poetry. I apologize that this isn't going to happen this month and that it had to be reschedule, as I know at least two people were prepared to post. I hope that the delay will not upset your willingness to participate. Once a week is selected I will post a sign-up post so people can pick the day that works best for them.

Poll #10269 Rescheduling Multi-Hosted Week on Teaching Poetry
This poll is anonymous.
Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 3

Which week in May would fit better with your schedule and make it easier for you to participate in this Multi-Hosted week?

View Answers

May 7 - 13
1 (33.3%)

May 14 - 20
1 (33.3%)

May 21 - 27
1 (33.3%)

May 28 - June 3
2 (66.7%)

May is a terrible awful month and I have no free time during it at all.
1 (33.3%)



Questions, concerns, comments?
jjhunter: Paper sculpture of bulbuous tree made from strips of book pages (poetree admin icon)
[personal profile] jjhunter
This week at POETREE we peek behind the curtain to explore the world of editors, community moderators, and others who are involved in publishing poetry and/or distributing it online. From newly Kickstarted Plunge magazine to our very own POETREE, we'll look at what makes poetry publications and communities tick from the perspective of the people who keep them running, and what it's like to be one of those people behind the scenes.

This week is very much a work in progress, so please keep an eye on this post for updates regarding the schedule Tuesday - Saturday. Sunday will be the launch of two new weekly POETREE features, to be announced the day of.

Current schedule behind the cut )
jjhunter: Paper sculpture of bulbuous tree made from strips of book pages (poetree admin icon)
[personal profile] jjhunter
This upcoming week we'll be taking a break from our usual one Poetry Host per week format in favor of a multi-Hosted themed week. For those who are newer to POETREE, a multi-Hosted week features multiple Poetry Hosts, one per day, who post according to an overarching theme for that particular week. Our most recent one was back in January: Poetry Complements. If you're interested in Hosting here at POETREE but don't have time to do a full week, I strongly urge to sign up for a single day slot for this week. (If that doesn't apply to you but you want to Host anyway, more power to you! We'd still love to have you Host.)

Our theme this time around is 'unusual poetry formats'. For the sake of this context, 'unusual' is any format that is not commonly found in contemporary English poetry. As such, haiku would not qualify as unusual, but haikai would; sonnets would be a borderline case, while sestinas would easily be in the clear. Since [personal profile] lnhammer has done such a wonderful job of covering them this week, please consider tankas already taken; likewise, we've covered haikai here at POETREE in the past.

If you would like to Host a day and a particular format, please leave a comment on this post detailing which format and what days work for you. Formats & dates are assigned on a first-come, first-served basis. When it comes time to post, please provide a brief overview of your chosen format and its historical context, and give an example or two of poems written in that format; poems may be yours or others' or some mix thereof. Anything else you would like to include that you consider relevant is delicious gravy.



[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
- Poem: "Fair Maiden Meets Fierce Villain" [example of format]
- Format: Terza Rima

[personal profile] jjhunter
- Format: Villanelle (Pt. 1 of 2)
- Format: Villanelle (Pt. 2 of 2)

[personal profile] bookblather
- Format: Sestina
jjhunter: Paper sculpture of bulbuous tree made from strips of book pages (poetree admin icon)
[personal profile] jjhunter
I define a complement as a piece that is specifically created to complement another work in different medium. In the case of poetry, a complement is a work of art, piece of fiction, or other non-poetry creative work that is inspired by or is designed to add another dimension to a person's experience of a particular poem.

Quote by Leonardo da Vinci superimposed over indistinct dimmed paints
TEXT: "Painting is poetry that is seen rather than felt, and poetry is painting that is felt rather than seen" - Leonardo da Vinci. (For image credits, please see bottom of post.)


This week will be a multi-Hosted themed one: we'll be hearing from one or more guest Hosts with experience creating poetry complements, as well as a post by myself. I'm also looking for three two one more additional volunteers to be single-day Hosts to post in one or more of the following categories at some point this week: a.) a question re: poetry complements for general discussion; b.) one or more links or recommendations re: particularly effective or well-done poetry complements; c.) meta about poetry complements of any type. If you've hesitated to sign up for a full week Hosting in the past, this is an excellent chance to dip your feet in the water; if you've Hosted or will be Hosting, however, you are still welcome to sign up via comment to this post.


=
Details regarding scheduling and people signed up to date to Host a day this week )

IMAGE CREDITS: Image [modified by [personal profile] jjhunter in GIMP] originally from an article about Louise van Alenburg's "Hot versus Cold" poetry/art show.
jjhunter: Watercolor of daisy with blue dots zooming around it like Bohr model electrons (Default)
[personal profile] jjhunter
Given how busy everyone seems to be right now, our theme for this upcoming week will not focus exclusively on a poetry audio recording fest like I initially suggested. Instead we'll have a free association game week. What does that entail? For each day someone different will post a poem, a sentence fragment/prompt, an image, or a song link. Your task will be to do at least one of the following at least once each day: a.) respond to the post or a comment with a poem that the post or comment reminds you of; b.) do an audio recording of a poem in the post or comment threads and link to it in your reply (SoundCloud is your friend for uploading); or c.) respond to one of the poems in the comment threads with a song link or a small image (with link to source) that it reminds you of.

For the purposes of this week alone, while alternatively published, non-published, or public domain poetry is preferred (yours or others'), contemporary traditionally published poetry is also fair game.

Please comment to this post to claim a day; days will be assigned on a first come, first served basis, and I'll fill in for any that are unclaimed.

MONDAY (12/12): [personal profile] alee_grrl
TUESDAY (12/13):
WEDNESDAY (12/14):
THURSDAY (12/15): [personal profile] georginasand
FRIDAY (12/16):
SATURDAY (12/17):
SUNDAY (12/18):
jjhunter: Paper sculpture of bulbuous tree made from strips of book pages (poetree admin icon)
[personal profile] jjhunter
Following up on my post from yesterday regarding the upcoming week, I think I may have found us a Poetry Host with audiobook & poetry recording experience! If ze decides to go for it, would people be interested in having the following week be a week-long Poetry Recording Fest? It would involve people from inside and outside our community recording and sharing as much poetry as possible. Each day would have a roundup post of links involving that day's suggested poem (listening to multiple recordings of the same poem can be surprisingly awesome) + whatever other poetry people felt like recording. Alternatively we could fall back on my original plan for this week being pushed to next week or doing a themed week with a different theme.

Questions, comments, observations and/or lamentations all welcome.
jjhunter: Paper sculpture of bulbuous tree made from strips of book pages (poetree admin icon)
[personal profile] jjhunter
[personal profile] lynnoconnacht's post on Thursday re: 'She Walks In Beauty' included a link a beautiful rendition of the poem set to music. Online and off line most of us are accustomed to encountering poetry on the page or the screen, but poetry started as a spoken medium. For this upcoming week, I'm interested in sharing recordings of poems that I'll be performing myself. If anyone wants to join in, it would be wonderful to have a co-Host or two. No prior experience required, nor much in the way of fancy equipment; if you have access to a Mac like me, you can use the app Garageband which comes free with the computer. LibriVox has some good information for anyone looking for more tips on how to get started & other free software you can use.

In order for this to work, however, we need poems to record, recite, perform, declaim, spill forth from our tongues and hearts, and it would be most fun to do so with poems submitted by the audience. Any poem which has not yet been posted in full here at the comm is eligible. Please comment here with the text or a link to the text of any poem or poems you'd be interested in nominating, and don't be shy about putting forth your own work if you're comfortable with doing so.

ETA: old recordings (yours or others') of poetry are also welcome.

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